Manual to the world #2

It’s already Friday again?  When I decided to make this a weekly feature, I forgot how short a week really is.  I might have to change the frequency and make it biweekly or monthly.  If every other entry in the journal is going to be a part of this series, things might get boring real fast!

For now there are plenty of cool tips to share, so here’s number two:

OasisNYC is a great online resource for community maps.  I love maps, so I had a lot of fun with this.  The OasisNYC map is an interactive map that shows you the location of community resources like public gardens, playgrounds, tennis-courts, parks, and much more.  You can even create your own map with just the information you are interested in and save it, print it or link to it from your own website.  While this is primarily aimed at New York city dwellers, it could be a great tool for visitors too.  And who knows, maybe something similar is available for where you live?

The OasisNYC website has a lot of other interesting information that you won’t on the map so definitely check that out too!  The menus might not be the most user-friendly and the copy on the website gets a little ‘governmental’ at times.  Here’s a little example from their mission statement:

The OASIS website is guided by a collaborative partnership of private and public sector representatives that seek to sustain an accessible information system that helps enhance the stewardship of open space so these areas are linked, diverse and sustainable for the benefit of all people, organisms, and ecosystems in and around New York City.

One of the best things about living all the way uptown is the amount of green space. That's what I always remind myself of when the A-train decides to go local!

Yes, that was one sentence…  All of the information given here is relevant, and most likely accurate too, but I would argue that there is a better way to communicate it.  However, this entry is not about copy-writing or web design, it’s about a great resource for information that is otherwise hard to get by.  And most of the information is presented in an awesome map! what more do you want?  It’s Friday today, go look for a nice park or playground to visit this weekend!

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Storm King Art Center

Yesterday, Laura and I went to Storm King Art Center. Only an hour north of New York City this sculpture park is a great place to enjoy fall foliage and escape the city for a few hours.

As big fans of Andy Goldsworthy we especially enjoyed his works. That’s right, works! if you’ve been to Storm King you will remember his famous piece, Storm King Wall (1998).

This year he added another work to the collection, Five Men, Seventeen Days, Fifteen Boulders, One Wall (2010). This work is smaller in scale, but the concept is similar to Storm King Wall, because of the title it forces you to think about the resources that go into creating sculptures of this size.

After seeing the amazing Goldsworthy documentary, Rivers and Tides, I was already really impressed with the scale of his work and the patience he has in creating it.  What I like most about site specific, outdoor sculptures is how they change with the seasons.  This is especially true for Goldsworthy’s work.  How spectacular must the Storm King Wall look when it’s covered in snow, snaking through the forest and disappearing into a frozen pond?  Too bad the park is closed for the winter season…  There’s always Google image search but that’s just a meager substitute for the real experience.

Of course there is much more to enjoy at Storm King than Goldsworthy’s work, even the park itself is so beautifully landscaped it’s worth the trip north.  Visit the Storm King Art Center website and start planning a visit!

For more pictures, check out Laura’s blog.